Archives

Price, UT Weather

Categories

Tags

Recent Visitors

So, How’s That Border Security?

I’ve read from several sources in the federal government recently that the border is “as safe as it ever was” whatever that’s supposed to mean.  What many people don’t seem to understand or care about is that there’s a whole lot of land and not that many law enforcement officers to guard it.  People who live a short distance from the border are starting to get past being fed up and are now becoming royally pissed off.  They’re talking to their elected representatives, but many of those representatives are basically telling them to piss off.

Via Weasel Zippers:

That’s Representative Pete Stark.  Sure seems to respect the opinions of those who elected him, doesn’t he?  I can think of a few snarky responses to that first bit from him, but sadly many would likely get me arrested.  What really pisses me off is the overall attitude.  Until Rep. Stark agrees to live in Chula Vista or San Ysidro and camp out for a few weeks on the border out in the desert all without armed guards, I’d invite him to shut the F**K up.  What a worthless piece of debris.

Of course, not all elected officials in the desert southwest are clueless assholes like Rep. Stark.  Arizona Governor Jan Brewer not only has a clue, she’s also got a set of big brass ones the likes of which neither Rep. Stark or President Obama could even conceive of lugging around.  She’s as thoroughly enraged as her constituents are and she’s not afraid in the least to go public with that anger.

From Theo Spark:

Turn the clock back 100 years and tell me what you think would happen if the government tried to pull a stunt like putting up these signs.  They’d be tarred, feathered, and run out on a rail.  Literally.  How the people responsible for this abomination have managed to escape impeachment is beyond my comprehension.

I’d be more than happy with Jan Brewer as the President of the United States.  I don’t care about gender or race – just whether or not the candidate has a clue and some common sense.  Jan has both.  Take a look at Arizona’s recent gun laws and what they’ve done with illegal immigration.  I’d be proud to live in Arizona!

Regardless of the outcry of the Citizens out here so far away from D.C., the media usually ignores the problem and presents race pimps like La Raza and Jesse Jackson to tell us we’re just racist jerks not far removed from the KKK of the old south.  Most of the media and the politicians keep telling us to quit whining – it’s not dangerous to be down here.  They conveniently forget about those signs Jan Brewer’s about ready to burn down.

And then something happens to draw the spotlight to just how bad it really is down there.  Why, this happened just today:

From the El Paso Times:

EL PASO — Several gunshots apparently fired from Juárez hit El Paso City Hall on Tuesday afternoon.

No one was hurt, but nerves were rattled at City Hall in what is thought to be the first cross-border gunfire during a drug war that has engulfed Juárez since 2008.

El Paso police spokesman Darrel Petry said investigators do not think City Hall was intentionally targeted but rather was struck by stray shots.

“It does appear the rounds may have come from an incident in Juárez,” Petry said.

City Hall, whose east and west sides are covered by glass windows, sits on a hill about a half-mile north of the Rio Grande.

About 4:50 p.m., city workers were going about a regular day when a bullet penetrated a ninth-floor west side window of the office of Assistant City Manager Pat Adauto.

I still haven’t figured out how this is supposed to be a safe and secure border like the politicians say it is.  Maybe the jerks in D.C. mean that it’s safe for them? That’s the only way it makes sense to me.  I’ve got a solution for that problem, but I don’t know how we’d go about getting all the buses together to send all the illegal aliens from AZ to D.C.  I wonder how the high and mighty President and Congress would react if this many criminals were dumped on their doorstep for a change?  Maybe that’s not so good an idea – Congress and the President would probably just feel right at home with all those crooks.

So, what do you think?

Share

Tonight I shed a tear or two

Deadliest Catch. The episode with the stroke that took Captain Phil Harris of the Cornelia Marie. Sig, Andy, Keith and the new guy on the Kodiak did also. Sig almost lost it telling the crew of The Northwestern.

BTW, hard, tough men do cry. We do.

There is a certain bond among those who go down to the sea, in ships. Yeah, from the Bible. Expecting something else?

I can not even try to explain, only those who have been would understand.

To Captain Phil, Fair winds and following seas.

Share

Supreme Court Upholds Second Amendment For All U.S. Citizens!!!

Folks, this is a great day :D

The Supreme Court has told Chicago Mayor Daley (a fan of rape by firearm) to to piss up a rope :twisted:  They’ve said that the Second Amendment applies to all U.S. Citizens and cannot be infringed by local, county, or state governments.  Chicago and a few other places have a de-facto ban on handgun ownership and tried to claim that the Second Amendment only bound the federal government, not the states and cities.

The decision in the McDonald case came down five to four which while a victory is disappointingly close in my opinion.  Still, it’s a win and I’ll take it :)

For much better coverage than I can give while I’m at work, check out David Codrea’s Gun Rights Examiner column – click here :wink:

Share

Picture(s) A Day – 26 June 2010

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve posted, but I finally managed to get a few pictures for y’all :)

Saving money has been my biggest concern lately – I’ve even refrained from shooting for the most part :shock:  Yeah, the Strip has been off limits for the most part :P  Still, trips to Infinite Arms / New Frontier Armory have been called for to acquire supplies such as paracord for new projects.  And that’s why I was over there yesterday :wink:

26 June 2010 - Sig P250 in digital desert camo

26 June 2010 - Sig P250 in digital desert camo

26 June 2010 - Sig P250 in digital desert camo

26 June 2010 - Sig P250 in digital desert camo

Yep, more cool guns :)  The Sig P250 is a rare breed of gun – what’s normally considered the frame isn’t in this firearm.  The grip is merely a piece to hold the magazine and the fire control group.  Next time I’ll be smart enough to take the slide and barrel off so you can see how that works, but for now just believe me when I say you can swap the serial numbered part between different size grips and different caliber assemblies.  This means that you can have a 9mm, .40 S&W, and a .45 ACP pistol with only one legal firearm.  You can also have those calibers in a subcompact, compact, or full size package.  It’s also a double action only gun like my PF-9 so the hammer starts from the forward position and has to be pulled all the way back with the trigger before it can swing forward to strike the firing pin.  Think of it as a revolver with a slide and a magazine :wink:

Along with the options of caliber and size, you can swap out grips for color.  Lots of people are either bored with black guns or just think the different colors are cool and the firearms industry has taken notice.  I like the digital desert camo on this P250 and if the prices were the same, I’d probably buy it over a normal all black gun :)

26 June 2010 - Draco AK-47 pistol

26 June 2010 - Draco AK-47 pistol

26 June 2010 - Draco AK-47 pistol

26 June 2010 - Draco AK-47 pistol

Legally, a rifle has a shoulder stock and must have at least a 16 inch barrel unless you register it as a Short Barreled Rifle (SBR) under the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA).  That means paperwork, a background check, and a $200 transfer tax.  This Draco pistol looks like a short barreled AK-47, but because it’s never had a shoulder stock, it’s just a pistol under the law.  You can add a forward vertical grip if you want to, but that would require NFA paperwork and a $5.00 transfer tax as an Any Other Weapon.  Sometime in the future, I’m planning on getting a Draco, doing the paperwork, paying the tax, and adding a side folding stock to make it a very compact SBR.  Add a sling and it would be a dandy car gun :twisted:

26 June 2010 - LAR Grizzly .50 BMG rifle

26 June 2010 - LAR Grizzly .50 BMG rifle

Banned in California as too dangerous for their possibility of use by terrorists based on zero facts, rifles in .50 Browning Machine Gun (BMG) caliber are large, heavy, and expensive both to purchase and to feed.  This LAR Grizzly rifle isn’t expensive at all when it comes to big 50 rifles.  What’s worse is the price of ammo – assume $3 to $5 per round.  They’re meant to be shot at distance with 500 to 1000 yards being common.  You need lots of practice to do this well and I don’t know how you’d do that cheaply.  But it’s still a really cool gun 8)

Once again, I have to thank Infinite Arms for the opportunity to photograph some really neat guns as well as for providing a fitting size reference in that $100 bill :wink:  Some people think it’s a bad idea to hand me guns and money, but it’s all good :P

26 June 2010 - Lens from a camera used in the U-2 Dragon Lady

26 June 2010 - Lens from a camera used in the U-2 Dragon Lady

26 June 2010 - Lens from a camera used in the U-2 Dragon Lady

26 June 2010 - Lens from a camera used in the U-2 Dragon Lady

One other stop was in order yesterday.  Hahn’s Military Surplus is my go to source for pants.  I like quality BDU trousers as they hold up better than anything else I’ve found, they’ve got enough pockets to carry all the stuff I usually have on my person, and they’re loose and comfortable.  Unfortunately, you will pay for what you get when it comes good BDUs which in this case means about $50.  But it’s worth it :)

Hahn’s is an old school surplus store like I remember.  They’ve got clothing, camping gear, mining gear (including Geiger counters for uranium hunters), MREs, knives, inert grenades, and a lot of other cool stuff.  Not everything is for sale.  These are labeled as being U-2 cameras, but I wasn’t sure about that.  What’s really cool is that I’ve got TD Barnes on my email list and he knows everyone in the Road Runners Internationale :)  TD checked with some sources and found that these aren’t really U-2 cameras, but they are the correct lenses  :D  Years ago when the U-2 was new, these were highly secret items along with those jets which were developed here in the Nevada desert during the Cold War.  I’m thankful they’re still around for people to enjoy and that they like the Road Runners are finally getting the recognition they deserve 8)

That’s about it for now, but there’s going to be more in the very near future.  Have a great Sunday :mrgreen:

Share

Borrowed from a friend! She pointed out the obvious!

And the German Shepard is a Male!

I swiped this from a Face Book Friend. Lori, from Waxahachie, Texas. Been there. More than once. Ballast Trains.

She had this up on her wall at FB. It was too cool to pass up! I did ask her for permission, OK! She said she swiped it herself. Texas girls, gotta love ‘em!

Share

I’m Still Alive!

Yep, it’s been a bit of a rough patch lately.  Work’s been a bit more of a pain than usual, but that’s not all.

It’s probably the change in the weather that’s caused me to lose the most sleep.  I tend to deal a bit better with cool weather than overly warm and while it’s only been between 100° and 105° it’s still warmer than I’m used to.  I might kid Kath and a few others about the hot weather they’re dealing with, but I do still feel it.  I’m looking forward to the thunderstorms in July, but I can live without the heat wave that will come sometime soon.  105° is quite warm, but when it hits 115°, 120°, or 125°+, it’s worse.

While I might have been absent from my own blog lately (big thanks to Glenn for keeping the cobwebs at bay :wink: ), I haven’t been completely idle.  I’ve taken up a new hobby and it doesn’t have anything to do with explosives.  It’s even allowed at work :shock:

Adam over at Infinite Arms has started to carry paracord.  Also known as 550 cord or parachute cord, it comes in many different colors and patterns.  Hikers and campers use it for all sorts of things and it’s become a form of crafting to make all sorts of stuff out of paracord that’s either useful in its own right or it could just be a way to keep more ready in an easier to carry fashion.  You’ll find guys and gals doing this and I figured it looked like fun :)  I don’t have any pics ready just now, but there will be plenty in the future 8)

So to sum it all up, work’s work, summer in Las Vegas is warmer than I’d really like, and life goes on out here in the desert.

Have a great day, everyone :mrgreen:

Share

For ****’* and Giggles

May 1972

It is what it is. This is 38 years ago. Not funny. I was the first male member of my family on my Dad’s side to formally graduate from high school. And no, I did not have to shave!

August 1985, Re-enlistment at VA-122 NAS Lemoore CA

The Missus. Pat, Brian, Me, The CO(I don’t remember his name) Amanda in front. In the FRS en-route to VA-147.

AIMD Hydraulic/Pneumatic Shop NAS Lemoore Night Shift

I was the shift supervisor. I remember three names. That is all. AE2 Joe Kerr is on the left. He wound up at Hydraulic Research Textron. AMH3 Orosco behind me got banged up in a motorcycle accident. AMH2 Jay Rector got on with Parker Hannafin if memory suits me. This was taken in 1987-1988 sometime. And we were good at what we did.

And for Jeff. I got the Postcard! FAR OUT!

Share

Goodbye to a Friend at Falcon

We said farewell to Rod at Falcon Maintenance on Friday evening at Coach’s in Rosamond. The sort of official watering hole for all at Edwards AFB.

The Missus made a cake just for Rod. It blew him away. He was constantly thanking her.

Rod and the Cake!

Cutting the cake.

A really nice memento!

Words from the Boss, Tony.

Falcon Maintainers. A REAL FUN BUNCH!

A good time had by all. We shall miss Rod but know that he is on to bigger and better things!

Share

Silencerco Osprey!

Silencerco - image used with permission

Silencerco - image used with permission

I recently had a chance to get a bit of hands-on time with a rare new piece of equipment.  The 45 Osprey is a fairly new offering from Silencerco and not too many people have ‘em yet.  Lucky for me, I’ve got friends in the business :wink:

Before we go any further, let’s go over just a few details.  Many people (even in states like Nevada and Arizona) think that silencers are illegal.  They think that unless you’re military or law enforcement that these devices are forbidden under federal law.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  If silencers are illegal in the United States, it’s state law that makes them so.  Many more states allow for private ownership than don’t.  AL, AR, AK, AZ, CO, CT, FL, GA, ID, IN, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NM, NC, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WI, and WY have no problem with civilian ownership.

FN Herstal FNP-45 and Silencerco 45 Osprey

FN Herstal FNP-45 and Silencerco 45 Osprey

FN Herstal FNP-45 and Silencerco 45 Osprey

FN Herstal FNP-45 and Silencerco 45 Osprey

Yep, I was back down at Infinite Arms / New Frontier Armory :)  They just got their first Osprey in and I had the opportunity to get some time with it hands-on.  Unfortunately, this one is already sold so we couldn’t do any live fire with it.  If I know the group of gun guys I hang out with, someone will buy an Osprey and I’ll have a chance to see how quiet it is in person.  The 45 Osprey is the first .45 ACP suppressor which is hearing safe without using some sort of ablative media like water or grease.  Shooting a suppressor “wet” means using water, grease, or another substance in the can and brings the noise level down quite a bit by cooling the gases which causes them to contract.  Silencers act like mufflers and slow their escape so lower volume means slower escape and less noise out the front.

Silencerco 45 Osprey with a Glock 21 SF fitted with an extended magazine

Silencerco 45 Osprey with a Glock 21 SF fitted with an extended magazine

Because the Osprey attaches to the muzzle of a weapon instead of being an integral part of the barrel or firearm, it can be used on anything with a threaded barrel.  The Glock above doesn’t have a threaded barrel so we had to pose the pieces together on the counter top.  I would love to own this system – you can’t ask for a better pistol than a Glock, the magazine holds 28 rounds, .45 caliber is a hard-hitting round, and the 45 Osprey makes for a very pleasant and quiet way to enjoy it all 8)

Just me getting artsy with the Silencerco logo on the 45 Osprey

Just me getting artsy with the Silencerco logo on the 45 Osprey

I don’t know about you, but that Silencerco logo is one of the best I’ve seen :)

Attachment point for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Attachment point for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

The business end of the Silencerco 45 Osprey

The business end of the Silencerco 45 Osprey

As you might have noticed, the Osprey is a bit different than your average suppressor.  It’s rectangular and “eccentric” which means the path of the bullet through it isn’t down the center.  This gives the Osprey more internal volume which contributes to its quiet nature.  There are other eccentric silencers out there, but Silencerco chose to go with a slab-sided appearance rather than a conventional round shape for a couple of reasons.  Aside from making the Osprey look like an extension of most of the likely host weapons, it also adds to the ability of the host and suppressor to be holstered.  Silencers are cool, but sometimes you need your hands free and that’s where a holster shines :)

One of the problems you run into with eccentric suppressors is that of “indexing” the suppressor to the firearm.  You can’t know exactly which way the suppressor will be oriented in relation to a firearm when you first thread it onto a gun.  The Osprey uses a lever and brake on the lower rear of the unit to deal with this issue, but more about that later :wink:

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Recoil booster (AKA Nielson device) for the Silencerco 45 Osprey

When using a suppressor with a locked breach pistol, you often need to use a “recoil booster” or “Nielsen device” to ensure proper cycling.  When a locked breach handgun is fired, the barrel moves back with the slide for a short distance before the slide disengages from it and continues on its way back.  The motion of the slide is controlled by the rearward force generated by the firing of the cartridge and the forward force of the spring which returns the slide to battery at the end of the cycle.  Adding a silencer, even one as light as an Osprey, can throw the balance of forces off and cause the gun to fail to run correctly.  The added weight of the suppressor keeps the barrel from moving back with as much momentum as it would normally have.

A Nielsen device uses a couple of concentric sliding cylinders and a spring to get around this.  When the round is fired, the barrel and slide begin to move back and the dead weight of the suppressor is isolated by the sliding of the cylinders inside one another before the spring returns them to their resting positions.  The Silencerco version of the Nielsen device is modular so you can take it apart to clean it or to replace the part that threads onto the gun’s muzzle with one for a smaller caliber.  Buy a 45 Osprey and you can use it with a .40 S&W or 9mm with the correct adapter.  It’s best to use a dedicated suppressor for each caliber, but they’re not cheap and there’s that federal transfer tax to deal with.  A 45 Osprey is still pretty darn quiet with those other rounds.

Silencerco 45 Osprey - Engagement point for the indexing system

Silencerco 45 Osprey - Engagement point for the indexing system

Silencerco 45 Osprey - Engagement point for the indexing system

Silencerco 45 Osprey - Engagement point for the indexing system

Here’s the back end of the Osprey with the Nielsen device removed.  You can see the threads where the Nielsen device attaches to the suppressor as well as the cam lever indexing system.  The indexing brake has teeth cut into it like a gear (see the area circled in red above) which engage teeth on the Nielsen device to ensure that once the suppressor has been indexed to the firearm it doesn’t move.

Engraving on the Silencerco 45 Osprey

Engraving on the Silencerco 45 Osprey

For those people out there who haven’t read my previous post about the Silencerco Sparrow, one of the most important concerns for a civilian owner of a suppressor is preventing damage to the serial numbered part.  As I said earlier, there’s nothing in Federal law preventing a civilian from owning a silencer but that doesn’t mean the Feds don’t have anything to do with it.

As part of the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA – not to be confused with New Frontier Armory :wink: ), silencers are regulated by the Federal government along with short barreled rifles, short barreled shotguns, machine guns, and “Any Other Weapons” (AOWs) like disguised guns and smooth bore pistols.  It takes a bit of paperwork, a federal background check, and payment of a $200 transfer tax upon the transfer of ownership.  The only other consideration of owning and using NFA items is that you have to get permission from the Feds before you cross state lines with them.  Other than that, they’re just like any other gun.

The upshot of this is that the only part that has paperwork and a $200 transfer tax associated with it is the serial numbered part.  By law, this is considered to be the firearm or in this case the suppressor.  Damage to any other part merely means replacing that part.  Damaging the serial numbered part usually means replacing that part and even if it’s covered under warranty, the owner is on the hook for another $200 transfer tax.  Designing a silencer with an eye towards preventing this is rather important as you can imagine.

Osprey in its component parts - Image courtesy of Silencerco :)

Osprey in its component parts - Image courtesy of Silencerco :)

Joshua Waldron is the CEO of Silencerco.  After corresponding with him for a while now, I have to say that he’s one of the most responsive, approachable, and friendly executives I’ve had the chance to deal with :)  It’s only because of his generosity that I have the picture above and for that I’m very thankful :D  Because this is not a user serviceable unit, I couldn’t disassemble the unit at Infinite Arms for pictures.  Joshua was kind enough to take the time and make the effort to take this picture and provide it to me for this post and for my readers.  That’s what I call service 8)

The Sparrow is designed to be fully user serviceable for a reason.  As I noted before, you not only get buildup from burned gunpowder in a rimfire suppressor, you also get lead buildup because rimfire ammo is not jacketed.  With non-jacketed ammunition, you get a mist of molten lead from the muzzle when you fire the gun.  That lead solidifies on the internal components of the suppressor causing a loss of internal volume and sound reduction.  If you can’t take a rimfire suppressor apart to clean it yourself, you have to send it back to the manufacturer every few thousand rounds to have them do it for you.  You’ll pay for it every time and you’ll also have to do some paperwork with the BATFE.

Centerfire suppressors don’t have that problem for the most part because they fire jacketed ammunition.  Because the copper jacket on the bullet isn’t molten when it leaves the barrel, all you get is some residue from the burned gunpowder.  That means you don’t have to make them user serviceable which means that they’re not as complicated :wink:  You should never have to send your Osprey back to Silencerco for work under their lifetime warranty as long as you use it as it was intended.

Going from left to right in the picture we have the parts are the Nielsen device, the rear end cap, the outer tube, and the monolithic baffle stack with its Nielsen device interface and front end cap.  Click here for a picture I’ve edited to label each of the parts :wink:

The design of the Osprey incorporates several key design features.  We’ll start with the Nielsen device.  Three component parts make up the Nielsen device – the piston, the spring, and the spring retainer / indexing ring.  The piston is caliber and thread specific – it’s the only part of the Osprey system that needs to be changed out when changing to a smaller caliber firearm or a different thread pattern.  The spring retainer / indexing ring attaches to the piston to retain the spring and it’s the part that the indexing brake engages to properly index the Osprey to the host. It’s also the part that threads into the Nielsen device interface at the rear of the baffle stack and physically attaches the Nielsen device (and therefore the piston which is threaded to the barrel) to the host firearm.

The rear end cap houses the indexing cam and brake and is only connected to one other part of the unit – the outer tube.  There are no threads on it, so it can’t be galled or cross-threaded.  There are no baffles connected to it so it can’t be damaged by a baffle strike.  It’s one piece of metal so there are no joints to crack or break.  That’s good engineering in my book!

The Nielsen device interface is the round part at the end of the baffle stack.  The primary blast baffle is in the front of this part and it’s made of 17-4 heat treated steel.  The primary blast baffle is steel instead of aluminum for strength and durability – Silencerco doesn’t skimp on anything and everything is done for a reason.

Moving on to the monolithic (one piece) baffle stack, the design of the modified slant baffles was meant to increase the stability of the bullet as it passes through the suppressor.  An increase in bullet stability reduces the possibility of a baffle strike (a bullet hitting a baffle which is highly undesirable) while minimizing the shift in the point of impact in relation to the point of aim that comes with using most silencers.  Not all of the baffles are modified slant baffles – the first baffle in the stack is a secondary blast baffle with a similar shape to the baffles in the Sparrow (Silencerco’s rimfire suppressor) to further maximize bullet stability.

If anything isn’t clear in how I’ve described everything, please either email me or contact Silencerco and we’ll be glad to help you :wink:

We’ve already talked about the advantages of the overall shape of the suppressor, but we haven’t talked about the materials.  The majority of the Osprey is aluminum which is why it’s so light.  At 11.1 ounces, it’s very light and I didn’t find it uncomfortable in the least while gripping the FNP-45 with it attached.

Now that's what I call a fun setup - FNP-45 with high mounted night sights and a Silencerco 45 Osprey :twisted:

Now that's a fun setup - FNP-45 with high mounted night sights and a Silencerco 45 Osprey :twisted:

Folks, I’m not an expert and I know that there are other great designs out there.  I like Silencerco because they’re a small business with good, innovative ideas and who are making the best product they know how.  They focus on dry suppression so you don’t have to worry about whether or not you have water, oil or another ablative medium.  They’re affordable as silencers go and they come with a lifetime warranty.  It also helps that they’re so approachable, supportive, and responsive 8)  I can’t thank Joshua enough for the support he’s given me.  Of course, I also have to thank Infinite Arms for opportunities like this one :)  It also doesn’t hurt to have a $100 bill to use as a size reference in the pics :wink:

You can click here for Silencerco’s website, but you should also check them out on Facebook, YouTube, and their blog as well 8)

Share

Picture(s) A Day – 13 June 2010

This weekend was a bit trying as was last night – I was just beat.  I hope you’ll find it in your hearts to forgive my tardiness in posting these and that you might just like ‘em as well :wink:

Doyle is Cindy’s nephew who I’ve known for quite a few years now.  He’s getting ready to move up to Utah later this week, so we wanted to do something as a bit of a last time out for some fun :)  We’d originally planned to go shooting, but neither one of us really had the energy to actually follow through on that plan.  Instead, we headed on over to Margaritaville – Doyle’s a Parrothead, too :wink:

13 June 2010 - MARGARITAVILLE :mrgreen: !!!

That’s the main dining area at Margaritaville.  The whole ceiling’s a map of the Caribbean, there’s boats for booths, and a giant model of the Hemisphere Dancer (Jimmy’s Grumman Albatross amphibious airplane) with spinning propellers hanging over the customers.  Of course I love it :D

13 June 2010 - Doyle at Margaritaville

13 June 2010 - Doyle at Margaritaville

Believe it or not, Doyle actually shaved his head bald last summer and that’s just a year’s growth :shock:  Something tells me he’ll get a haircut about the time his grandmother sees him :P

13 June 2010 - VOLCANO NACHOS :mrgreen: !!!

A favorite dish of mine and many of my friends as well is this heaping plate of Volcano Nachos 8)  Without meat it’s only about $12 and with your choice of fajita chicken or beef it’s only about $15.  Neither one of us could be called small and both of us were very hungry, but together we barely managed to finish off this plate.

13 June 2010 - Where else do you find a volcano, a giant blender, & a surf board in one restaurant?

13 June 2010 - Where else do you find a volcano, a giant blender, & a surf board in one restaurant?

So this is the volcano and blender the girl slides into on weekends :)  Yes, there’s a scantily clad female who slides down and then does a whole twirling performance before dancing on the railing.  Somehow I think that adds to the crowd just a little :P

13 June 2010 - Song related artwork on the walls

13 June 2010 - Song related artwork on the walls

13 June 2010 - Song related artwork on the walls

13 June 2010 - Song related artwork on the walls

The artwork on the walls at Margaritaville is all related to Jimmy’s music.  For example, the top picture relates to the song and album Volcano while the second picture relates to the song and album Fruitcakes.  I often wonder how many people have no clue what they mean :)

13 June 2010 - Margaritaville VIP Card

13 June 2010 - Margaritaville VIP Card

I found out about this card and got it on Sunday, but I confess the picture was taken today.  This card is only for locals – you’ve got to have a Nevada I.D. to get one, but they’re free if you meet the requirements

13 June 2010 - Performers at Margaritaville 8)

13 June 2010 - Performers at Margaritaville 8)

Last but not least we have the performers who put on a great show several times a day on the weekends.  The guys are all on really tall stilts and aside from helping our lovely lady if she needs someone to balance against while on the railing, they also make balloon animals for the kids and the kids at heart.

Share